Film and Media Studies

Head of Department: Laura Pickering

Members of Department:

  • Mark Lickley (Deputy Head of Department)
  • Ben Clements

Film

Film is an important part of many people's lives. Those who choose to study it characteristically bring with them a huge enthusiasm and excitement for film which constantly motivates them in their studies. It is not surprising that many consider film to be the major art form of the last hundred years and that many feel it important to study a medium which has such a significant influence on the way people think and feel.

At Morpeth we follow the WJEC/ Eduqas specification in GCSE Film Studies which is designed to draw on learners' enthusiasm for film and introduce them to a wide variety of cinematic experiences through films which have been important in the development of film and film technology. Learners will develop their knowledge of US mainstream film by studying one film from the 1950s, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and one film from the 80s E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, thus looking at two stages in Hollywood's development. In addition, they will be studying more recent films – a US independent film; The Hurtlocker as well as films from Europe; The Wave. And British Films; Attack the Block and Slumdog Millionaire (a British film set in India).

Studying a diverse range of films from several different contexts is designed to give learners the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of how films are constructed to their own screenwriting project. For the non-examined assessment work (30% of the whole course) students write a screenplay and shooting script for the opening to a horror film; a project that has provoked some excellent creative writing in the last few years.

Film Studies at Morpeth is now a well-established subject with the option for further study at Alevel. The department has a history of excellent results in this subject.
AS, A level or at higher education institutions.

The WJEC Eduqas specification in GCSE Film Studies aims to develop knowledge and understanding of:

  • the ways in which meanings and responses are generated through film
  • a contrasting, culturally diverse range of films from different national contexts
  • film as an aesthetic medium
  • how films reflect the social, cultural and political contexts in which they are made
  • the relationship between film and film technology over time.

In addition, the specification aims to enable learners to apply their knowledge and understanding of film to filmmaking or screenwriting.

The department benefits from practical film making equipment, computers for every student, editing software and the use of two ex-industry media technicians.
We are committed to mixed ability teaching and recognise that to do this effectively the curriculum has to be planned carefully, ensuring progression, support and challenge.

Pupils’ progress is carefully tracked and intervention strategies are employed to support pupils who are underachieving.

Clcik here for curriculum overview

 

Media

The media is everywhere and young people spend most of their time learning from the media, even before they reach school age.  By the time they arrive in school, almost all young people will have experienced several years of television and online games as well as other mediums such as radio, films, and advertising. They will probably know what newspapers and magazines are, even if they don’t read them.

Media Studies aims to equip students with the skills to look critically at media texts, to use analytical skills to recognise how a film, magazine or video game can be understood on many levels, to learn to separate fact from fiction and to recognise how the media shapes our perceptions of the world through different representations, viewpoints and messages.

Media Studies is an exciting, challenging subject and is extremely popular with pupils.

At Key Stage 4, our pupils follow the Eduqas GCSE Media Studies course

It involves the study of a range of media, including:

  • Advertising and film marketing
  • Magazines
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Radio
  • Video games
  • TV sitcoms
  • Music videos and online media

 

The Media Department is staffed by a small team of enthusiastic and highly committed teachers, with experience of teaching this subject to A Level.

Pupils are taught in groups of 24 or under in dedicated Media Suites, which are equipped with 25 computers. These are loaded with professional media software packages, allowing our students to use industry standard technology in their own production work. There are also two media technicians who are experts in using the software and are always on hand to help the students create their practical work.

We regularly review our curriculum to ensure it prepares pupils for exam success, develops independent learning skills and, most importantly, to ensure that it is stimulating, challenging and enjoyable.

We are committed to mixed ability teaching and recognise that to do this effectively the curriculum has to be planned carefully, ensuring progression, support and challenge.

Pupils’ progress is carefully tracked and intervention strategies are employed to support pupils who are underachieving.

Click here for curriculum overview

KS4 curriculum

At Morpeth we follow the WJEC/ Eduqas specification in GCSE Film Studies which is designed to draw on learners' enthusiasm for film and introduce them to a wide variety of cinematic experiences through films which have been important in the development of film and film technology. Learners will develop their knowledge of US mainstream film by studying one film from the 1950s, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and one film from the 80s E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, thus looking at two stages in Hollywood's development. In addition, they will be studying more recent films – a US independent film; The Hurtlocker as well as films from Europe; The Wave. And British Films; Attack the Block and Slumdog Millionaire (a British film set in India).

Studying a diverse range of films from several different contexts is designed to give learners the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of how films are constructed to their own screenwriting project. For the non-examined assessment work (30% of the whole course) students write a screenplay and shooting script for the opening to a horror film; a project that has provoked some excellent creative writing in the last few years.

 

KS5 Curriculum

Film Studies at Morpeth is now a well-established subject with the option for further study at Alevel. The department has a history of excellent results in this subject.
AS, A level or at higher education institutions.

The WJEC Eduqas specification in GCSE Film Studies aims to develop knowledge and understanding of:

  • the ways in which meanings and responses are generated through film
  • a contrasting, culturally diverse range of films from different national contexts
  • film as an aesthetic medium
  • how films reflect the social, cultural and political contexts in which they are made
  • the relationship between film and film technology over time.

In addition, the specification aims to enable learners to apply their knowledge and understanding of film to filmmaking or screenwriting.

The department benefits from practical film making equipment, computers for every student, editing software and the use of two ex-industry media technicians.
We are committed to mixed ability teaching and recognise that to do this effectively the curriculum has to be planned carefully, ensuring progression, support and challenge.

Pupils’ progress is carefully tracked and intervention strategies are employed to support pupils who are underachieving.